How can the Community Preservation Act help The Gables?

April 14, 2017 Published by Julie Arrison-Bishop

The roof of the nearly 350 year-old Turner-Ingersoll Mansion, best known as The House of the Seven Gables, is in a state of deterioration. The organization has applied for grant funding from a number of sources to help with the replacement of the roof in the coming months including the City of Salem’s Community Preservation Act.

The citizens of Salem voted to adopt the Community Preservation Act in November 2012. The act assesses a 1% surcharge based on property tax values. Funds from this pool are allocated by Salem’s Community Preservation Commission. This group reviews applications for both non-profits and city entities and determines funding levels for four categories: open space, recreation, affordable housing, and historic preservation.

It is important to note that the state level law for the Community Preservation Act allows both non-profits and city entities to be considered for funding after a number of standards are met. At the statewide level, the Community Preservation Coalition boasts that nearly $1.75 billion has been raised by 172 communities in the Commonwealth. Locally, historic preservation projects such as the bell and clock tower at Wenham’s First Church and museum restoration at Georgetown’s Brocklebank Museum have been beneficiaries. At The Gables, replacement of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Birthplace roof was partially funded through CPA in 2015.

If you are interested in learning more about the CPA process, please visit the Community Preservation Coalition. The CPC supports work at both the statewide and local levels. Readers can learn about the facts regarding local laws, fundable projects, and more.

We hope that you’ll support for The House of the Seven Gables in the upcoming round of CPA funding. Contact the Salem Community Preservation Committee to voice your support.

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This post was written by Julie Arrison-Bishop